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It’s no secret by now that I grew up in eastern Pennsylvania — I spent the first 26 years of my life there — and one thing there is a lot of in east PA is diners. During my high school years I spent the majority of my budding social life hanging out all hours of the night in a wide variety of diners and coffee shops. Heck, I even got my first serving job as a waiter in a diner!

When I was 17, I was even an extra in an independent film called “The Florentine,” starring Michael Madsen, Tom Sizemore and Luke Perry, that had a scene shot in a classic hole-in-the-wall greasy spoon called Dina’s Diner. I spent more than eight hours that night sitting in a booth, pretending to drink coffee and talk to a perfect stranger — as if he was my best friend, of course. To me, sitting in a coffee shop talking to my fellow freaks, geeks and diner rats was just a harmless way to pass the time and feel like I had a life. I can think of at least 20 such haunts, right now, off the top of my head; I’ll assume you believe me, though, and spare you the time.

Nowadays, I don’t drink coffee anymore, and I spend 97 percent of my nights doing homework and updating my blog posts. Every now and then I get bit by the nostalgia bug and venture out to a diner to see how it might compare to those I fondly remember from back home. Twice a year I fly back East to see my family and usually go out for a good, old-fashioned helping of greasy-spoon bacon and eggs — for old times’ sake.

Since coming to Cache Valley, I’ve passed Angie’s diner with its brightly lit sign and the slogan, “Where the locals eat,” dozens of times. Any time I drive through Logan, I always see several bumper stickers making the proud assertion: “I cleaned the kitchen sink at Angie’s.” I’ve always figured the “kitchen sink” has to be some kind of food challenge worthy of TV coverage. The other night, I finally decided to eat where the locals eat and perhaps discover what this Kitchen Sink is all about. After all, I thought, maybe they make you clean the kitchen if you’re unable to pay your bill.

I usually only review Cache Valley eateries on this blog when they have some kind of local salience or special presence. I figured Angie’s deserved a shout out since it seems to be a Cache fixture. If the owners are confident enough to claim that their restaurant is the place where the locals eat, then I think it belongs on the Cache Valley Visitors Bureau blog’s radar. It turns out that it came up as more than just a blip on my radar.

After I asked my server what the locals eat when they eat where the locals eat, I wasn’t particularly intrigued by any of her suggestions. Then again, this is kind of what I expected — after all, it is a diner. Instead of the local “usual,” I decided to go with a California burger. It was good. The patty was definitely well done, which is how they eat their beef here in northern Utah — as opposed to the medium-rare bloody goodness we like back East — but it still had flavor.

In between bites of cheeseburger I was lucky enough to notice, from across the restaurant, a group of young ladies who had just been served the famous “Kitchen Sink” — at least when I saw a server walk past me with a giant metal tub of bananas, whipped cream, chocolate sauce, ice cream and cold, sticky, messy awesomeness, my intuition told me that it had to be the sink! The Angie’s menu includes a picture of this unique dessert that really does it no true justice. At a whopping $11.99, I actually think the Kitchen Sink would be worth every penny, as long as you have several friends to help eat it. Otherwise, if you’re on your own, you’re liable to end up with an expensive headache, stomachache and brainfreeze.

Being the adventurous reporter that I am, I wandered down to the table where these ladies were enjoying their dessert and asked if I could take a picture of them — kind of as a last will and testament sort of thing. They willingly obliged, which is how I met USU student Liberti Summers and her sisters Harli, Starr and Dakota. All four ladies valiantly ate every last bite of the ginormous banana split on steroids and were awarded their complementary bumper sticker.

For those who look for a tamer, single serving kind of dessert, Angie’s also offers a variety of individual-sized, homemade delectables that I’d certainly recommend. So far I’ve had the cheesecake and the chocolate cream pie — no complaints here.

A few nights after my first visit, I went back to Angie’s with some friends to give the food another go, just for good measure. This time I had the ever-satisfying, late-night omelet. Now, that’s good stuff. I can certainly stand behind the fact that the food at Angie’s is your standard, run-of-the-mill diner fare — just the way it should be — and I wouldn’t have it any other way. Only it’s obvious the food is served with a little added TLC.

To any of you readers who are planning that dream trip to Cache Valley in the near future: If you get into town and it’s late, you’re tired and you’re not sure where to eat, stop by Angie’s and give it a try. Or if you’re well rested, it’s early, and you’re looking for a good place to start your day, come say “Hi” to the locals. I haven’t gone there often enough — yet — to have my own booth set aside, but you may just see me there flirting with the waitresses or reading an issue of The Utah Statesman. That’s right, Angie’s carries copies of our very own college newspaper, the one I happen to work for. So, until next time, I’ll see you at Angie’s, “Where the locals eat.”

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