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Archive for November, 2011

During the summer of 2010, I embarked on a mission to find the best place in the valley to watch the beautiful sunsets we are so sweet-spoonful-of-sunoften blessed with in Cache Valley. Eventually, I raced atop Old Main Hill at Utah State University and saw one of the more epic sunsets I’ve ever witnessed. Since that day, I kind of gave up on trying to find other places to see the sunset from an unadulterated, unobstructed area. I guess, someday, I will have to pick up where I left off. I’m sure there are plenty places out there.

It seems that most times when a great sunset is in progress I’m driving, or at home — with or without my camera — and never in a good enough place to get a shot without trees, houses, or other buildings or objects in the way. Nowadays, with winter fast approaching, the sunset happens so fast that if you’re not ready for it, it’s come and gone before you know it.

This is the time of year when it gets dark by 5 p.m. We also experience that wonderful weather phenomenon referred to as the inversion; and while it may bring some slightly unhealthy air days, one of the advantages to having it is the higher frequency of brightly colored, attractive sunsets.

sunset-perfect-ending1For those of you who like a good sunset, look to the west any given evening just before the sun ducks behind the Wellsvilles, and you may get lucky enough to catch the brilliant pinks, reds and oranges glowing through the clouds. I’ve noticed there’s really only a 5- or 10-minute window of truly magnificent brilliance, and then the sun is gone and the sky looks just like any other fading memory of the day.

In Cache Valley, this time of year, I’ve noticed most people have already assumed to say it’s winter, even though we are actually supposed to have another month of autumn. Honestly, I can’t say I blame them. It has, after all, snowed half a dozen times and the temperatures are usually in the single digits at night.

I take comfort in saying, though, that I’m completely OK with this. Somewhere along the way, I’ve grown to appreciate the cold weather. Perhaps it was the few years I spent in southeastern Utah, living in the desert. Maybe it’s the beautiful, temperate Cache summers that wouldn’t be so appreciable without a few months of snow and bitter cold.

Either way, there’s nothing like walking outside on a sunny winter morning and seeing the sun glistening off of the snow-covered Wellsville mountains. For those who have only seen pictures of this, I invite you to visit us in the winter.

Many will tell you to stay far away from here this time of year. They’ll say it snows all the time and your car will freeze to its parking space overnight. I can’t say this is a lie, but I can say, with a warm chuckle, that it’s good cause to curl up with a warm mug of hot cocoa or chamomile and enjoy the cold winter sights from the warmth of a cozy living room.

In the wintertime, that’s the best place to see the beautiful Cache sunrises and sunsets — from the warmth of my home. Come by and I may just invite you in for a cup of herbal tea or hot chocolate. We can chat about capturing that elusive perfect sunset photo and all of the other reasons Cache Valley is a great place to be in the wintertime.

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I’d like to talk a little bit about something I’ve heard, both from people who’ve lived here for a while and people who have not. I regularly hear the utterance “There’s nothing to do in Logan,” or “It’s northern Utah, there’s nothing to do here.” For the past few weeks, I’ve wanted to blog my response to this misinformed sentiment. Perhaps I realize all of the great attributes of the area because I am lucky enough to have a job as blogger for the Cache Valley Visitors Bureau. Doing this forces me to go out and find things to do. Perhaps my wide range of interests allows me to be easily entertained — my sometimes childlike curiosity provides the impetus to become more involved with my surroundings.

I can confidently say, though, there is actually a lot to do around here. I have a hard time believing anyone who says, “This place is boring.” First of all, it’s hard to walk outside and not see a mountain peak — or several — somewhere on the horizon. Where there are mountains, there are things to do. Hiking, camping, birding, sight-seeing, photography, videography, rock climbing, mountain climbing, snowshoeing and hunting are just a few of the options mountains make available to people of all ages and levels of outdoors experience. Anyone who likes to get out of the house for a bit and breathe fresher air should consider doing so in either the Wellsville or Bear River mountains that surround Cache Valley to the west and east, respectively.

A short drive through Logan Canyon, Providence Canyon, Hyrum-Dry Canyon, Green Canyon, or any of the nearby canyons I haven’t mentioned, can afford a lifetime of fun, outdoors experiences. I’ve personally attested for some time to the concept that Utah — just about any part of Utah — can make a great photographer out of even the least visionary of individuals. Just check out the CVVB blog for a handful of ideas for places to go.

Aside from the list of naturally occurring places to visit locally, I’ve also begun to showcase several of the eateries, restaurants, shops, shows and events that are indigenous to Cache Valley. I’m also considering checking out a few of the entertainment venues located on campus at Utah State University. The university alone has an art museum, anthropology museum, various lecture series and a few different concert halls and theaters. In the surrounding metropolitan area there is also the Ellen Eccles Theatre, which I’ve covered a couple of times, the Logan Art House and the Old Barn Theatre, and near Bear Lake there is the Pickleville Playhouse. Eventually I’d like to investigate all of these places — and I will.

Cache Valley is also home to a wide variety of food-oriented attractions such as places found on the Cache Valley Food Tour and the seasonally popular local gardeners markets throughout the valley. I have scratched the surface in this realm, but I have a lot of work — and a lot of eating — to do, before I’ve truly become acquainted with all of the wonderful homemade creations local to this area. In the spring, I plan to head to Richmond (just north of Smithfield) to visit the Rockhill Creamery, which just recently received a historical award. The creamery produces artisan cheeses, among other tasty creations, and I intend to learn all about them.

The fact is I could spend the rest of my life writing for the Cache Valley Visitors Bureau, and I’d probably have a hard time exhausting all of the possibilities. I promise all of the wonderful people who have continued to follow this blog that I will do this as long as I’m allowed to. I hope to see you all out and about, checking out the great things there are to do in Logan and beyond. Whenever someone complains about not having anything to do, I suggest you greet them with skepticism or disbelief. Perhaps you can direct them to this site. If anybody out there has suggestions for something for me to do, I would love to consider it. If you’ve had the chance to experience something you believe makes Cache Valley special, please sign in and comment about it.

Cache Valley has been a great community to get to know. Having been here for two and a half years, I know there’s still so much to experience, but I’m glad I stumbled across this great place. Keep on reading, and I’ll see you out there.

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